How To Reverse The Effects Of Personal Bankruptcy

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How To Reverse The Effects Of Personal Bankruptcy

How To Reverse The Effects Of Personal Bankruptcy

With the economic crisis striking several years back, the trickle down has affected us all. We realize that things are only costing more and bills are still piling up. As a result, we are left with limited options, and some of us are even thinking of filing for bankruptcy. However, we do not have to take that route. Read on to learn why.

Many people do not know that student loans are not dischargeable debt under bankruptcy laws. Do not go into your bankruptcy thinking that your student loans will be discharged, because only in cases of extreme hardship are they considered. If the job you received from pursuing your degree will never allow you to pay off your debt, you may have a chance, but it is highly unlikely.

The best way to build your credit up after a bankruptcy is making all your payments on time. Since it is important that you work to rebuild your credit, you should instead think about applying for a secured card. When you do this, it shows your determination to fix your credit history. Once creditors see that you are making an effort to restore your credit, they may allow you to get an unsecured card in the future.

Watch your lawyer fill out your paperwork carefully. They, most likely, have multiple cases going on at the same time and may not be able to keep up with every detail of your case. Be sure to carefully read all of that paperwork, in order to make sure that everything is filled out correctly.

A critical tip in filing personal bankruptcy is to steer clear of making payments to creditors, in advance of filing a petition, in an attempt to satisfy individual debts in full outside of bankruptcy court. Payments to family members and creditors made within defined periods of time prior to a bankruptcy filing can be voided and can jeopardize the chances of receiving a discharge of all debts in the case.

Do some research. There are two main types of personal bankruptcy – Chapter 7 and Chapter 13. Chapter 7 will eliminate the majority of your debt while Chapter 13 restructures it to give you time to pay it off. Each one has different rules on what assets you are allowed to keep. So, ask a lot of questions before you decide which one is the best fit for your situation.

Think carefully before filing Chapter 7 bankruptcy. While Chapter 7 bankruptcy (irreversible insolvency) will effectively get rid of all your debts, allowing you to start afresh, it will also be on your credit report for 10 years. This will greatly reduce your chances of getting any type of credit in the future. Consult with a bankruptcy attorney – he or she may be able to suggest a different form of debt relief that won’t have such a damaging effect on your credit.

Remember that until your bankruptcy is filed, you must not ignore any bill collectors or lawsuits by creditors that could result in wage garnishments. The same holds true of delinquent auto loans that can lead to repossession. Once the bankruptcy has been filed, you will be protected from these creditors, but until then, be sure to make timely payments or try to negotiate with them to avoid lawsuits, lost wages and repossessed property.

Bankruptcy should be a subject that you are not afraid of. Why should you fear something that is not going to affect you? Make sure that you do not find yourself falling down a hole and limited financially by filing for bankruptcy. Use what you learned today, so that you can look at a promising future.

 

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